Day Four - Thursday 26 May

12:00-12:05

Welcome Acknowledgement of Country

12:05-1:05

Keynote Speaker and
Ken Mahon

Engaging Industry and Defining the Value you Bring

Increasingly the focus for research and researchers is on engagement and impact which requires much greater collaboration with external partners in Industry and Government. But often that engagement is much shorter in duration and seeking outcomes sooner than the time frame for a PhD or broader research strategies. We will discuss the how researchers can identify the value they bring to external partners, some simple approaches to creating effective commercial relationships that deliver value and support research programs, professional development and a career in academia and/or Industry.

Increasingly the focus for research and researchers is on engagement and impact which requires much greater collaboration with external partners in Industry and Government. But often that engagement is much shorter in duration and seeking outcomes sooner than the time frame for a PhD or broader research strategies. We will discuss the how researchers can identify the value they bring to external partners, some simple approaches to creating effective commercial relationships that deliver value and support research programs, professional development and a career in academia and/or Industry.

1:05-1:15

Note-taking Break

1:15-1:45

e-Poster presentations


See the e-Poster presentations, and have an opportunity to ask questions of the presenters.

1:45-2:00

Snack Break

2:00-4:00

3 Minute Thesis Heat 2

The 3MT competition students’ academic, presentation, and research communication skills and their capacity to effectively explain your research in a language appropriate to a non-specialist audience. The Asia-Pacific 3MT Competition is hosted annually by UQ and is held in over 900 universities across more than 85 countries worldwide.

Judges:  TBA

Judge Deliberations, People’s Choice voting and Finalists announced

4:00-4:10

Afternoon Tea Break

4:10-5:50

Themed Breakout Session 3

First Nations ResearchModerator:  Dr Holly Randell-Moon

This session will feature research by First Nations researchers those who are researching with First Nations communities.

4:15   Linda Deravin and Jess Biles

A mentoring program to support Cultural Safety for Nurses and Midwives to stay in the health workforce

This research project examined the effectiveness of a mentoring program aimed at supporting First Nations nurses and midwives in a regional area. Participants were either mentees or mentors that were drawn from those who had completed a 12-month mentoring program. Using an hermeneutic phenomenological philosophical framework, interviews were conducted with participants using First Nations people’s methods of yarning, and then an analysis of those yarns was conducted by the research team. Five themes that emerged from the data were cultural safety, motivations, relationships, learning, and support. The experiences of the participants indicated that mentoring provides both clinical and cultural support and a safe space for First Nations nurses and midwives. The research project also identified that First Nations led projects nurture organisational connections and feelings of cultural respect amongst First Nations staff beyond program participation.

4:31   Jessica Russ-Smith

Wiradyuri yinaagalang yanhambilnha bulabul: Wiradyuri women walking together. Embodying sovereignty and sacred relationships within Indigenous research

Relationships are core to Indigenous and Wiradyuri research. Myself and my primary supervisor are both Wiradyuri yinaagalang (women). This relationship has been core to my PhD journey and ever transforming learning as a researcher. Wiradyuri ways of knowing, being and doing teach us that 'relationships are the foundation of everything ' (Grant Snr and Rudder 2014, p. 5) and that everything exists within relationships. This way of being has guided my PhD research and is a way through which we embody our Wiradyuri yinaa sovereignty. The sharing of knowledge and reflection within the sacred relationship between Wiradyuri yinaagalang resists oppression of Indigenous women within the academy. Wiradyuri understandings of relationships provide transformative insight into how research can challenge dominant Western epistemologies and knowledge hierarchies to celebrate, honour, and respect Indigenous ways of knowing. Through these relationships we embody our sovereignty: hear our sovereignty, it will not be silenced.

4:47   Linda Deravin

Cultural Safety for First Nations people in aged care an integrative review

The gap in culturally safe care for First Nations people has been identified by the 2019 Royal Commission into Aged Care services. The findings from this review highlight the need for aged care service providers to consider ways to address this gap in service and care provision. Major themes and concepts significant to the experience of First Nations people and requiring further investigation are; barriers to communication, racism and discrimination, impacts on health outcomes, healthcare workforce education needs, and the importance of cultural connections to Country and kin. These themes influence the perception of First Nations people feeling culturally safe when engaging with aged care services. The direct involvement of First Nations people is paramount and includes recruiting more First Nations people into the aged care workforce, involving more First Nations family and community members in the development of programs for aged care and retaining a consistent workforce overall.

5:03  Moderator - Summary and Thank you

5:15End of Day 4